History of Anne Boleyn rise to throne

History of Anne Boleyn rise to throne

Anne Boleyn, Quee of England, 1533-1536. Who has heard of her? The amount of people that would respond to this question with a negative is minimal. From as early as nursery/kindergarten children are taught the bare basics of this immortal lady. They are pressured to learn that she was the second wife of King Henry VIII of England one of the most notorious and feared kings of all time. But who actually knows the real her? The person inside? The soul hiding behind the crown? Yet again the amount of people that would reply with a positive to this is minimal. This progression of articles has been created in order to inform the world what this woman’s life was truly about, her loves and romances, her passions and dreams and above all what really spurred her on to become the figurehead she is today.

Geoffrey Boleyn’s Rise To Fame

During Anne’s brief moment in the spotlight as Henry’s mistress, wife and queen her family could quite often be referred to as “New money” due to the fact that before certain family members made their name known they were nothing more than traders. The Boleyn family rose to wealth during the lifetime of her great-grandfather Geoffrey Boleyn. Geoffrey Boleyn was a poor merchant and the younger son of a farmer who had travelled to London to find his fortune; during his stay in the main city he managed to attract a respectable wife and was soon raised to Lord Mayor of London in 1457. Not long after this fete he received a knighthood. In order to create a comfortable environment for his wife and family he bought two residences during his lifetime: Blickling Hall in Norfolk and Hever Castle in Kent.

Once his wife had delivered him the son he needed, Sir Geoffrey Boleyn secured their rise and wealth by arranging an advantageous marriage for his son to Margaret Butler. Margaret Butler was the second daughter of the Earl of Ormond; an ancient and noble family. The earldom was extremely wealthy as when the Earl finally deceased he left his daughters a total of 72 manors in England alone as well as donating one thousand pounds to London charities, which was a large amount of money at the time.